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Yields Of The Dividend Aristocrats | 12 Cheapest Stock Of The Index

Today I've attached a list of the yields from the Dividend Aristocrats for you. You can also find the payout ratios in this table. It's very informative in my view and I use this overview too in order to get a feeling about the pricing of the market.

Dividend Aristocrats are stocks that have increased dividend payments over a period of 25 consecutive years without a break. That's a top value and around 100+companies could achieve this goal.

Standard & Poor's increases the restrictions and cut the list to 42 members. Well not all stocks are good from the list but you can find there some value player. Just take a look!
Only 12 companies yield over 3 percent. Not bad for a low interest environment. The bond market offers 1.56 percent and has also default risks.

The top yielding stocks also slow grower full of debt. Which stock do you like or own from the list? Let me know your thoughts and write a comment. Thank you.



These are my main thoughts to the Dividend Aristocrats list:

- When we look at the highest yielding stocks with yields over 3 percent, we see that only 3 companies have a low forward P/E.

- Stocks with a lower yield are much cheaper. 9 companies with yields less than 2 percent have a forward P/E under 15.

- Low yielding stocks pay out less of it's annual earnings and might be reinvest more money into growth.

Also read this: 25 Of The Most Attractive Dividend Stocks

These are the 12 cheapest Dividend Aristocrats:


Company
Ticker
Mcap
P/E
P/B
P/S
Yield
AT&T, Inc.
T
182.96B
10.38
1.99
1.40
5.22%
Consolidated Edison, Inc.
16.50B
13.04
1.33
1.26
4.47%
Chevron Corporation
230.66B
11.59
1.49
1.06
3.52%
Exxon Mobil Corporation
406.98B
12.16
2.26
0.96
2.89%
Bemis Company, Inc.
3.80B
17.37
2.25
0.77
2.84%
AFLAC Inc.
26.50B
9.24
1.51
1.14
2.53%
Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
246.49B
16.00
3.18
0.51
2.51%
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc.
14.10B
23.14
2.00
1.26
2.31%
The Chubb Corporation
21.98B
11.19
1.36
1.58
2.19%
Medtronic, Inc.
62.04B
21.40
3.27
3.61
1.93%
Archer-Daniels-Midland Company
32.84B
20.43
1.65
0.37
1.89%
Franklin Resources Inc.
34.39B
15.41
3.04
4.13
0.87%


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8 comments:

  1. This is excellent, thanks! I hold 6 of those and would like to add to the positions of 4 because the other 2 are as large as I would
    them in this level of my portfolio size, great work!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous9/29/2014

    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous9/29/2014

    Very good overview. Perhaps what is needed is recent 5 yr dividend growth as a 7th column in your table. Div. growth is just as important as yield. That data can easily be pulled from e.g. gurufocus.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your commet. For sure dividend growth is important but more important is in my view the expected or future dividend growth which also depends on earnings growth and debt and payout figures.

      Delete
  4. Howard9/29/2014

    Thanks, Tom. I added CINF, CLX, and KMB to my spreadsheet after looking down your list.

    I have a question about a stock, ESV, that isn't an "aristocrat", but that I probably got from one of your earlier columns. At any rate, it's rated high on my spreadsheet, but I haven't bought it because the 'Payout Ratio' is 163%.

    I calculated the Payout Ratio from the EPS of $1.84 that I see at Schwab and TD America. However, Bloomberg ( http://www.bloomberg.com/quote/ESV:US ) shows this:

    "Earnings Per Share (USD) (ttm) 4.4200
    Est. EPS (USD) (12/2014) 5.8190"

    That's plenty of earnings to support the 7% dividend, but why are those figures different from what I'm seeing at Schwab and TDAmerica?

    Thanks for any help,
    Howard

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. KMB and CLX have high debt amounts outstanding. That's a big burden, especially for CLX. But Heinz had also high debt ratios and was overtaken by Warren Buffett.
      ....but why are those figures different from what I'm seeing at Schwab and TDAmerica?
      - Each financial site uses a different database. The best way is to check the investor relations site of the company for the real earnings number.

      Delete
  5. Thanks for the post! I love these articles I have to say, they give me ideas that I may not have noticed or thought about on my own. I have your site on my bloglist so I can see when you make new posts. Great stuff, keep it up.

    CD

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Captain Dividend, I'm also a big fan of your site and I visit them on a regular basis. We have sometimes the same great ideas. Good Work!

      Delete

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